Packaging

Compression Fittings

Compression Fittings

Tube to Union

Tube to Union

J 518C SAE FLANGE

Cleaning and packing as per ASTM G93 Level C

FOUR BOLT SAE FLANGE

FOUR BOLT SAE FLANGE

CODE 61 & CODE 62 FLANGE

CODE 61 & CODE 62 FLANGE


TU-LOK SAE FLANGE

TU-LOK SAE FLANGE

An aspect of delivering superior quality products to the buyer is its packing. Often during transportation, it gets damaged. Abrasion is a problem that one cannot prevent during transport. However, preventive measures are a part of packing. These measures ensure the goods do not have any defects. At Tu-Lok, we practice a three-step packing method. The use of primary, secondary, and tertiary packing optimizes the delivery conditions while ensuring the safety of the goods during transit.

The primary packing includes the use of either zip-lock or plastic bags. These plastic bags act as a protective layer and prevent product damage during transit collision. Moreover, primary packing completely seals the product and locks out moisture, thus, preventing corrosion. In addition to forming a protective layer, this kind of packing contains detailed information that may be required by the end-user. In cases where the products have a threaded construction, plastic packaging may accompany a small box packing as well. For instance, the manufacture may add in the batch number,  manufacture, and expiry date, how to use instructions as well as its features. Ordinarily, this packing is retail, as this single unit sells retail to an individual buyer.

While the primary packing entails individual product packing, the secondary packing entails holding several single-unit products together. Typically, the secondary layer packaging includes the use of a carton or a small box. This box not only bundles several single units together but may also be handy for other purposes like protection and marketing. So manufacturers use corrugated boxes printed with a logo, company name, and some high definition images to attract prospective buyers. Often, attractive packing yields higher sales value, which, in turn, increases profitability.

Unlike both primary and secondary packing, a tertiary pack may not be available to the retail buyer. The reason for this is that a tertiary packing consists of a large volume or is available in bulk. Manufacturers use the tertiary pack as a means to provide compact packing.  Since the quantity of secondary packing clubbed together is high, the mobility of individual units remains restricted, and the chances of erosion drastically reduce. Hence, the tertiary pack ensures the safe arrival of products. Since the idea of this kind of packing is safe delivery, manufacturers have a choice of either using a printed box or a regular one. This packaging is in such a manner that it remains a convenient method to shuffle across inventory quickly. Tertiary packaging often accompanies ease in handling.  Typically this kind of packaging could be anything. It could be a large box, which is an aggregate of smaller containers, which in turn secures the end products. Or the packaging could also be a full pallet setup with a corner board. Or the tertiary pack could be a stretchy transparent cling film that wraps multiple products, which, in turn, are held together. At this level, the tertiary package is to be hone to such an extent that it combines products in a close-knit fashion. This level of the packaging must ideally offer all the highest form of protection required by the products during transit. Both shipping and storage conditions can present challenges. Hence, tertiary packaging is a method wherein one can amplify the level of protection, thus, ensure the safety of products to their final destination.

Accompanying a tertiary packing is a delivery note. A delivery note contains several details, including the purchase order number, part number, quantity, description of the material, as well as the name and address of both the buyer and the manufacturer. These details aid in the easy tracking and identification for both the consignor and consignee.